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Main Street America

As a Main Street America coordinating program, Wyoming Main Street helps leads a powerful, grassroots network consisting of more than 40 coordinating programs and more than 1,200 neighborhoods and communities across the country committed to creating high-quality places and to building stronger communities through preservation-based economic development.

Wyoming Main Street is a Main Street America coordinating program that promotes and manages the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Main Street program for the state of Wyoming.

Wyoming Main Street’s purpose is to assist Wyoming communities of various sizes and resource levels with downtown revitalization efforts.

Wyoming Main Street is a program of the Wyoming Business Council.

Wyoming Main Street is not a grant program; it offers technical assistance to communities interested in revitalizing their historic downtowns and helps coordinate efforts to work with the Business Council’s Business Ready Community grant and loan program to provide publicly owned infrastructure for downtown business development and quality-of-life projects.

The Wyoming Main Street program provides communities with technical assistance for revitalization of commercial business districts using the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Main Street Four Point Approach:

  • Organization: Organization establishes consensus and cooperation by building partnerships among the various groups that have a stake in the commercial district.
  • Promotion: Promotions communicate a commercial district’s unique characteristics, its cultural traditions, architecture, history and activities to shoppers, investors, visitors and potential business and property owners.
  • Design: Design means getting downtown into top physical shape; preserving a place’s historic character and creating a safe, inviting environment for shoppers, workers and visitors.
  • Economic Vitality: Economic vitality is a strategy to retain and expand successful business by providing a balanced commercial mix, sharpening the competitiveness and merchandising skills of business owners, and attracting new businesses that the market can support. Converting unused or underused commercial space into economically productive property also helps boost the profitability of the district.

The four points of the Main Street approach work together to build sustainable revitalization efforts. The Main Street approach is incremental; it is not designed to produce immediate change. In order for a community to succeed, a long-term revitalization effort requires careful attention to every aspect of downtown.

The Main Street Four Point Approach is a community-driven and common-sense way to address a variety of issues and problems facing traditional business districts. The Main Street approach advocates a return to community self-reliance, local empowerment and the rebuilding of traditional commercial districts based on unique assets such as distinctive architecture, a pedestrian-friendly environment, personal service, local ownership and a sense of place. The underlying premise of the Main Street approach is to encourage economic development within the context of historic preservation.

Contact Info

Wyoming's contact with the National Trust Main Street Center is:

Links

Main Street America

The Wyoming Main Street program provides increasing degrees of technical and architectural assistance to three tiers of communities.

  • Aspiring communities are exploring downtown revitalization and wish to become an affiliate or certified community within the next two years.
  • Affiliate communities are in the beginning stages of downtown revitalization. Wyoming Main Street provides access to training and some on-site assistance.
  • Certified communities have paid staff and mature downtown development programs. Wyoming Main Street provides access to training, on-site assistance and resources for additional technical assistance.

There are two aspiring communities: Lusk and Worland.

There are seven affiliate communities: Douglas, Glenrock, Kemmerer, Pinedale, Platte County, Sundance and Thermopolis.

There are nine certified communities: Buffalo, Cheyenne, Evanston, Gillette, Green River, Laramie, Rawlins, Rock Springs and Sheridan.

Links

Certified Main Street Application

Affiliate Downtown Application

Aspiring Community Application

The Historic Architecture Assistance Fund provides the service of architects to the owners of historic buildings to address issues involved with the rehabilitation and use of such properties. The fund cannot support the entire architectural or engineering services needed for a complete rehabilitation project. Typical projects that can be funded include a building assessment, structural analysis, analysis of building code and ADA requirements, and façade and signage schematic design. Funds are not available for physical repairs, the purchase of building materials, or work by contractors.

The Architectural Assistance is available to a variety of property owners. The fund is meant to support private and not-for-profit property owners who are not eligible for many grant programs. However, government entities can also apply for the funds.

The program was established to provide assistance to properties that are historic, which is generally understood to be over 50 years of age. Any proposed work that the Architectural Assistance Fund would contribute to with assessment and design work must maintain or restore the historic integrity of the property. The fund is not intended to provide assistance with remodeling projects that would change the character of the historic building or address common utility system questions.

Links

2016 Historic Architecture Assistance Fund application

The governor appoints the seven-person Wyoming Main Street Advisory Board.

Current board members include:

Matt Ashby, Cheyenne

Marla Brown, Rawlins

Jim Davis, Evanston

Joe Fabian, Wheatland

Bill Hankins, Laramie

Sherri Mullinnix, Douglas

David Pope, Cheyenne